Press

The myriad reviews I have received will appear here – when I get one. Actually there’s a couple:

‘I’m not certain about my favourite colour, but I definitely prefer odd numbers to even…’

And so begins my first interview in a very long time, twinned with a review of Wrench to boot. I have the lovely Alex S of Yeah I Know It Sucks to thank for this gem – please, read on

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‘NO ONE IN THE MIRROR is an opus that invites us to deep introspection and reflection; takes us from great bleakness to shining light, though, the sense of extreme subtlety with which he establishes his own musical grammar, is defying and revolutionary as the overthrow of tyrants. Aspects of the self that were divided, gently melded and reunited again – the successful gathering of (sound) memory fragments back into whole organisms of perception.

Soundscapes that defy our imaginative perspectives. Never an excessive exigence to wish for longer pieces of work – No One In The Mirror’s timing makes us desire to listen to far more and for much longer time. The best of reasons to appreciate this distinct piece of work, eyes closed, quietly, in the wee hours when all is silent and finally the inner harmonic chords can allow themselves to align with the delicate, yet resilient, audible structures it presents us.’

The full text at Holmdel’s Horn blog includes a track by track review. Complete text here.

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‘Three Drones by Mutate

As a musical style drones are utterly fascinating and attractive due to their stillness, their grasp of the moment, and the artist’s ability to work in their confines, as she/he unlimits the limiting. I am unaware of how drones may have captivated Ade Bordicott, but using the alias of Mutate, Bordicott has created three amazing drone records on Electronic Musik: DrneDark Out, and Space Opera. I am unsure if all three albums are guitar-based drones as Space Opera is specifically mentioned to be, but given Bordicott’s history as told by Rollo Kim I would not be surprised.

As a member of the fiercely independent trip-hop / improv outfit Stray Dog City, and more recently a collaborator with like-minded realists And Fait Was Foolish and Mekano Set, Bordicott has consistently been one step ahead of the consistently retro plagiarisms of his local (Birmingham) indie scenes.

In the late 90′s, while his peers contented themselves with shameless Slint / Pixies / Pavement / Aphex impersonations, Bordicott and Stray Dog City combined a love of down-tempo, ultra-minimalst grooves with Post Punk and Dub bass-lines, found sounds and lively guitar drones.

Regardless of Bordicott’s journey toward drones or whether or not he’ll move elsewhere, none of that takes away from the beauty of these works. Each album has distinctive from the other; all three showing the artists in complete control of his craft.’

Original text by David Nemeth, here. Rollo Kim’s quoted text follows below:

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‘Mutate is the current incarnation of Black Country underground musician, DJ and noise-merchant Ade Bordicott.

As a member of the fiercely independent trip-hop / improv outfit Stray Dog City, and more recently a collaborator with like-minded realists And Fait Was Foolish and Mekano Set, Bordicott has consistently been one step ahead of the consistently retro plagiarisms of his local (Birmingham) indie scenes.

In the late 90’s, while his peers contented themselves with shameless Slint / Pixies / Pavement / Aphex impersonations, Bordicott and Stray Dog City combined a love of down-tempo, ultra-minimalst grooves with Post Punk and Dub bass-lines, found sounds and lively guitar drones.

DRNE strips those explorations of beat and riff to exposes the inner workings: drones that are far from static, clearly not built from samples and presets but out of real-time, physical performances.

This is Northern Drone. Black Country Soundscapes. Real-time, late-night, Isolationism. Robert Fripp meets Zoviet France.

An after-hours affair. A soundtrack to street lights, streets void of traffic, architectural dead-zones, car parks, public toilets, kitchens, abandoned bedsits. Post-industrial desolation.

DRNE then is something of a return to form for Bordicott. With ultra-slurred down dronescapes and covert location recordings, he’s clearly reclaiming his territory. Organic guitar textures stripped of attack and therefore all trace of even post-rock machismo. No ego. Just performance, balanced between sound and noise.

A little post-production / compression wouldn’t have gone amiss but after a few listens, the fluctuations in volume and timbre lend the pieces an all-natural, analog vibe that’s perhaps fitting of the style. I look forward to hearing where he takes this.’

Original text by Rollo Kim, here.

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I have some way older reviews I will add here when I find them out.

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